Faced with budget constraints, multicultural audiences turn to mobile phones for better health

Public health marketers trying to reach multicultural audiences need to take a mobile-first approach. Multicultural audiences tend to have larger out-of-pocket health expenses, delay seeking help from medical professionals and are more apt to look to mobile devices to manage their health. Top implications for public health marketers trying to reach multicultural audiences include: Budget constraints need to be addressed and taken into consideration in order to help multicultural audiences make positive health choices, especially Hispanics. Hispanics (76%) and African Americans (67%) were more likely than whites (59%) to say that budget at least sometimes limited their ability to make healthy choices. Hispanics (67%) and African Americans (67%) were also more likely than whites (52%) to say they sometimes avoided seeking medical help because of the cost. Health educational campaigns need to be mobile-optimized to reach multicultural audiences. 94% of Hispanics and 93% of African American respondents reported using mobile phones to help achieve their health goals compared to 88% Whites. 58% have used their phones to research information about a health issue. Hispanics (59%) and African American (61%) were more likely to use their phone to find health information than whites (56%). Social media distribution, influencer outreach, and mobile apps are great opportunities for initial attainment and ongoing engagement with multicultural audiences Hispanics (44%) and African Americans (40%) were more likely than whites (32%) to follow health-related social accounts Hispanics (46%) and African Americans (45%) were more likely than whites (39%) to read a blog for health info. Health app usage is high across ethnic groups at 57%. Hispanics (61%) and African American (60%) over-index on the use...

The Power of Silent Videos: Mute To Reach Millennials

After abandoning reading for watching videos, viewers can barely be persuaded to stick around watch a video. In fact, average attention spans have sunk below those of a goldfish. What’s a marketer to do? Data is showing that videos designed for no sound can help. 85% of Facebook video views are silent (Digiday) 84% of millennials silence video ads (Wibbitz) Half the audience who routinely skip ads says they’ll give silent ads a try. And the more video people watch online the more tolerant they seem to become of ad viewing. (Wibbitz) The upside is there, given millennials are 112% more likely to share ads they like than other age groups (Unruly). But proceed with caution.  We aren’t saying muting is enough – producing a video that works well without the sound takes some thought and effort. Here are few ways to make your silent videos work: Movement and readable information within the video help make a video on mute work as illustrated by this clever jewelry ad by Kay Jewelry. Happy Holidays! Thank you for celebrating the last 100 years with us! Posted by Kay Jewelers on Friday, December 23, 2016 Hotels.com won a well deserved Shorty Award for silent ad combining their usual cheeky humor with silence. The #IAmAWitness anti-bullying video produced by the Ad Council shows how strong graphics and data work well in silent mode. Good captions are key and Facebook has made that easier with automated captioning. Great examples of autoplay and silent ads over at the Facebook video creative spotlight area and Hubspot. Share your favorite autoplay and silent videos in the...

Super Tuesday Social Media Results: The Voter Engagement Funnel Is Under Construction

Super Tuesday was as exciting as expected! Here is my take on the campaign’s social strategies, which builds off a piece I did yesterday for Portada and a MocoSpace Community Voter Engagement Study Lens released last Friday. My biggest takeaway from a social-marketing-lessons-learned perspective was on the Democrat side. Basically, what’s coming out of the Bernie Sanders camp is really interesting from a content perspective. The Bernie team has done an excellent job of using authentic and issues-based content to spark engagement and even get his community to create content for him. It’s an Obama-like movement aka “Yes We Can.” This has led to some messaging and content that really stands out and has helped Bernie Sanders build an engaged community and war chest of more than 40 million in donations just in February. Here’s a shout out to one of the best Spanish Latino-targeted campaign videos I’ve ever seen aimed at Mexican Americans. It was made by David E Rojas, part of an Austin, Texas collective of artists working to create videos for Bernie: But as Super Tuesday showed, Bernie Sanders doesn’t seem to have cracked the code on getting votes. One supporter summed it up perfectly, “you need to vote, not just say you are.” The “We got so many tweets, likes etc. But they bought zero, they didn’t sign up” is something every social marketer struggles with.  Translating social interests and engagement to conversion is hard and often takes some not as exciting, backroom tech and data activities: building up proprietary data on fans, continuous engagement/management of these contacts and giving your organization access to the data they can actually use. Here is...

Campaigns Miss Out With Multicultural Mobile Gamers

60% of multicultural gamers have had no recent contact from a campaign As 2016 heats up, mobile gamers are following the election and engaging with candidates via social media, despite being largely ignored by campaigns.   That’s a top finding in a MocoSpace Community Check-In conducted by Social Lens Research. The survey had 2,351 completes and was fielded last weekend, February 13 to 14 without an incentive. The respondents were 46% white, 31% African-American and 16% Hispanic. MocoSpace is a top mobile gaming community with more than 50 million users. This diverse community represents digital-first populations who live online, are eligible to vote and plan to vote in above average numbers.They are highly active on social media, and widely broadcast their views to their networks.  And they are a growing part of the electorate.  Gamers are expected to grow to close to 56% of all Americans in 2016, and mobile games are played weekly by half the likely voting population. A third of likely Democratic voters play daily.   Key Findings: Opportunity To Increase Engagement: MocoSpace Community members are watching the 2016 campaign carefully.  Seventy percent read campaign stories via social media at least occasionally, 31% frequently. But 60% have had no recent contact from a campaign. African Americans The Most Engaged: More voted last time [83%],  more are registered to vote now [87%], and African Americans are most engaged with the campaign on social media. And they are solidly for Hillary Clinton – 54% more likely than the general population. Hispanics Not As Engaged: Least likely to be registered, not as committed as African Americans to Democrats or Hillary Clinton....

Iowa’s Unknown Voters

Eyes On Iowa   You can measure social media, but can you take it anywhere? Presidential campaigns have their first contact with actual voters Monday night in Iowa, and we might get our first real clues what’s going to work in the 2016 election, the first campaign expected to top a billion dollars in digital media spending. Print media used to alternate two election day headlines, “It’s Up To The Voters” rotating with “Turnout Is Key.” Covering social media in the buildup to Iowa is more all over the place. Many metrics are known, but how they win results if at all really is still up to voter turnout, and for whom. The leading candidates in both parties are pursuing very different social media campaigns. Incredibly Loud & Not Even Close? CNET labeled Donald Trump an “anti social media god” after his recent Iowa debate withdrawal. He dominated social media during and after the debate, and the night brought him 31,000 new Twitter and 17,000 new Facebook followers. But a study going from last March into January shows Trump may have not gained a lot from his numbers: “we were able to not only measure a campaign website’s number of shares through social media, but also see the top retweeted tweets that were authored by the campaign. On these metrics, Donald Trump was abysmal. Although his website was shared more than 61,000 times, Cruz’s website was shared more than 580,000 times.”                                         – Lara M. Brown,  Associate Professor, George Washington University Democrats...

Too Early to Call: Winning Social & Mobile Political Campaigns

2016 is here, and visions about election tech’s’ next big “It Girl” are everywhere. And all over the place.  The Washington Post’s Philip Bump ran through the many prophecies in a piece titled “Why 2016 Will Not Be The Snapchat election” – pointing to visions of the Meerkat election, the Periscope election, and the Facebook election, while somehow missing theSkimm election. Ahead of any actual votes there is a large dose of subjectivity in anointing both tech and candidate winners. Media rating of who is “winning” Instagram has brought us two Trumps and a Clinton, your mileage may vary. We may not yet know precisely how, but campaigns are doing many interesting things, and the leap in smartphone use Pew found since 2012 [from 46% to 64% of adults] means vast new playing fields for whatever does end up the tech politics winner. The big numbers come with some caveats.  Old people vote more, but you may only reach the 27% with smartphones.  And while Pew found 85% of phone users under thirty have smartphones, almost half max out on their data plans frequently or occasionally, which may damper enthusiasm for watching politicians for hours on Periscope. Some 2016 unknowns are legal.  A company doing digital fundraising for Bernie Sanders failed to persuade the Federal Election Commission to modify its disclosure requirements for mobile phone ads, which threaten to be larger than the ads themselves. Revolution Messaging asked that telephone mobile advertising be treated like other media where the Commission has found its own disclosure rules impractical because of size or other reasons.  But the FEC deadlocked 3 to 3, making no...